Rotary Swaging

Rotary Swaging

What is Swaging?

For anyone not directly connected to this specialist area of the engineering industry, ‘what is swaging?’ is a very valid question.

Put simply, rotary swaging is a rotary hammer forming process in which a tube or bar is shaped. Swaging involves tooling being produced which revolves around the workpieces as it is fed into the machine. The dedicated tooling has the relief form of the profile required machined into the internal section.

By reducing the cross-sections of the material, we are able to use rotary swaging to transform the diameter of an object, either externally or internally. Using this process, we are able to apply either a ridge, a groove or change the shape of the tube or bar/wire.

The main application of rotary swaging is the production of circular, concentric reductions on one / both ends of the workpiece or in the centre section. The process may also be used in producing 'irregular' forms e.g. hexagonal, octagonal and square sections. We regularly use the process in this way for work in the electronics and aerospace industries.

Rotary Swaging as a process, can be dated back to the early 20th century, however, technology and advanced machinery have made the process much more efficient.

At Techniswage, we continuously invest in the latest machinery to assist us in increasing the capacity of our swaging services and the diversity of the industries that we are able to supply.

Advantages of Rotary Swaging

The majority of components are formed in a cold state and as a consequence, the following are typical advantages of cold forming:

  • Short cycle times
  • Good surface finishes
  • Tight tolerances
  • No material loss -near net forming
  • Gains in wall thickness
  • Better grain structures
  • Increased strength and hardness.

As a result of 'work hardening' from the rotary swaging process, cheaper materials may be used, with savings in material weight and wall thickness. Practically all metals are suitable for rotary swaging including low carbon, high alloyed steels and stainless steels, non-ferrous and precious metals.

Tolerances on 25mm Dia. Of 0.01mm with finishes of Ra 16u are achievable.

What are the main principles of swaging?

Swaging units consist of a) a 'spindle', with guiding slots which contain the 'dies', 'hammer blocks' and pressure plates. b) a cage containing 'rollers'. C) the machine retaining 'track'. The spindle (1) rotates normally 300-500 rpm., this rotation forces outwards the dies (2), hammer blocks (3). As the roller (4) in the hammer block (3) strikes the 'Outer roller' (5) in the cage (6) the dies are 'hammered' together thus providing the forming blow. The opening and closing of the dies allow the component to be fed into the swaging machine with little effort from the operator or automatic feeder.

The spindle (1) rotates normally 300-500 rpm., this rotation forces outwards the dies (2), hammer blocks (3). As the roller (4) in the hammer block (3) strikes the 'Outer roller' (5) in the cage (6) the dies are 'hammered' together thus providing the forming blow. The opening and closing of the dies allow the component to be fed into the swaging machine with little effort from the operator or automatic feeder.
If you are still asking the question ‘what is swaging?’, or if you would like to find out more about our services, do not hesitate to contact us. To do so, you can either complete our enquiry form or call  0121 553 2364 for an informal chat.
Share by: